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Onset of volatile recycling into the mantle determined by xenon anomalies

S. Péron1,

1Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris - Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR CNRS 7154, Université Paris Diderot. 1 Rue Jussieu, 75005, Paris, France

M. Moreira2

Affiliations  |  Corresponding Author  |  Cite as  |  Funding information

Péron, S., Moreira, M. (2018) Onset of volatile recycling into the mantle determined by xenon anomalies. Geochem. Persp. Let. 9, 21–25.

Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris

Geochemical Perspectives Letters 9  |  doi: 10.7185/geochemlet.1833
Received 31 July 2018  |  Accepted 24 November 2018  |  Published 20 December 2018
Copyright © The Authors

Published by the European Association of Geochemistry
under Creative Commons License CC BY-NC-ND 4.0




Figure 1 Light xenon isotopic compositions for popping rock 2πD43. Measured data (blue dot) and corrected data for atmospheric contamination (orange dot) with a 129Xe/130Xe ratio of 7.6: (a) 126Xe/130Xe and (b) 128Xe/130Xe versus 124Xe/130Xe. For comparison, data of CO2 well gases from Caffee et al. (1999)

Caffee, M.W., Hudson, G.P., Velsko, C., Huss, G.R., Alexander, E.C., Chivas, R. (1999) Primordial Noble Gases from Earth's Mantle: Identification of Primitive Volatile Component. Science 285, 2115-2118.

(black points), Holland and Ballentine (2006)

Holland, G., Ballentine, C.J. (2006) Seawater subduction controls the heavy noble gas composition of the mantle. Nature 441, 186-191.

(black square) and Holland et al. (2009)

Holland, G., Cassidy, M., Ballentine, C.J. (2009) Meteorite Kr in Earth’s Mantle Suggests a Late Accretionary Source for the Atmosphere. Science 326, 1522-1525.

(grey triangles), and thermal springs from Caracausi et al. (2016)

Caracausi, A., Avice, G., Burnard, P.G., Füri, E., Marty, B. (2016) Chondritic xenon in the Earth’s mantle. Nature 533, 82-85.

(green square) and Moreira et al. (2018)

Moreira, M., Rouchon, V., Muller, E., Noirez, S. (2018) The xenon isotopic signature of the mantle beneath Massif Central. Geochemical Perspectives Letters 6, 28-32.

(red square) are shown. The solid line is a fit of the data, except that of Holland and Ballentine (2006)

Holland, G., Ballentine, C.J. (2006) Seawater subduction controls the heavy noble gas composition of the mantle. Nature 441, 186-191.

. The dotted lines indicate the 95 % confidence interval. Phase Q (Busemann et al., 2000

Busemann, H., Baur, H., Wieler, R. (2000) Primordial noble gases in "phase Q" in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites studied by closed-system stepped etching. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 35, 949-973.

), Solar Wind SW (Meshik et al., 2014

Meshik, A., Hohenberg, C., Pravdivtseva, O., Burnett, D. (2014) Heavy noble gases in solar wind delivered by Genesis mission. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 127, 326-347.

), Xe-U and AVCC (Pepin, 2003

Pepin, R.O. (2003) On Noble Gas Processing in the Solar Accretion Disk. Space Science Reviews 106, 211-230.

). These new data suggest a chondritic origin (Phase Q or AVCC) for upper mantle Xe.
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Figure 2 Heavy xenon isotopic compositions for popping rock 2πD43. Measured data (blue dot) and corrected data for atmospheric contamination (orange dot) with a 129Xe/130Xe ratio of 7.6: (a) 131Xe/130Xe and (b) 134Xe/130Xe versus 132Xe/130Xe. Data for sample 2πD43 from Kunz et al. (1998)

Kunz, J., Staudacher, T., Allègre, C.J. (1998) Plutonium-Fission Xenon Found in Earth's Mantle. Science 280, 877-880.

, for CO2 well gases from Caffee et al. (1999)

Caffee, M.W., Hudson, G.P., Velsko, C., Huss, G.R., Alexander, E.C., Chivas, R. (1999) Primordial Noble Gases from Earth's Mantle: Identification of Primitive Volatile Component. Science 285, 2115-2118.

(black points), Holland and Ballentine (2006)

Holland, G., Ballentine, C.J. (2006) Seawater subduction controls the heavy noble gas composition of the mantle. Nature 441, 186-191.

(black square), and thermal springs from Caracausi et al. (2016)

Caracausi, A., Avice, G., Burnard, P.G., Füri, E., Marty, B. (2016) Chondritic xenon in the Earth’s mantle. Nature 533, 82-85.

(green square) and Moreira et al. (2018)

Moreira, M., Rouchon, V., Muller, E., Noirez, S. (2018) The xenon isotopic signature of the mantle beneath Massif Central. Geochemical Perspectives Letters 6, 28-32.

(red square) are shown. The trends of pure 244Pu- and 238U-derived xenon productions are also indicated. The source of sample 2πD43 seems to be more influenced by Pu-derived Xe than U-derived Xe, contrary to other MORBs (Tucker et al., 2012

Tucker, J.M., Mukhopadhyay, S., Schilling, J.-G. (2012) The heavy noble gas composition of the depleted MORB mantle (DMM) and its implications for the preservation of heterogeneities in the mantle. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 355-356, 244-254.

; Parai and Mukhopadhyay, 2015

Parai, R., Mukhopadhyay, S. (2015) The evolution of MORB and plume mantle volatile budgets: Constraints from fission Xe isotopes in Southwest Indian Ridge basalts. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 16, 719-735.

).
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Figure 3 Determination of the maximum average age of recycled atmosphere in the mantle. The evolution of the xenon atmospheric composition is represented with the blue dashed line with the numbers indicating the time in Gyr (a power law was considered; Bekaert et al., 2018

Bekaert, D.V., Broadley, M.W., Delarue, F., Avice, G., Robert, F., Marty, B. (2018) Archean kerogen as a new tracer of atmospheric evolution: Implications for dating the widespread nature of early life. Science Advances 4, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aar2091.

). The corrected data for shallow atmospheric contamination is shown (light blue dot). The minimum (3.9 ± 0.6 (1σ); orange square) and maximum (21.9 ± 5.2 (1σ); red square) 136Xe/130Xe ratios in the mantle before recycling of atmospheric xenon are calculated considering mixing with air (orange and red dashed lines) and that the initial 128Xe/130Xe is chondritic (Phase Q; Busemann et al., 2000

Busemann, H., Baur, H., Wieler, R. (2000) Primordial noble gases in "phase Q" in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites studied by closed-system stepped etching. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 35, 949-973.

). The red line suggests that recycling of atmospheric xenon could have been effective only since 2.8 ± 0.3 (1σ) Gyr ago. Otherwise, unreasonable values of 136Xe/130Xe ratios are obtained.
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