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Concentration of meteoritic free organic matter by fluid transport and adsorption

C. Potiszil1,

1Pheasant Memorial Laboratory, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University, Yamada 827, Misasa, Tottori, 682-0193, Japan

R. Tanaka1,

1Pheasant Memorial Laboratory, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University, Yamada 827, Misasa, Tottori, 682-0193, Japan

T. Ota1,

1Pheasant Memorial Laboratory, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University, Yamada 827, Misasa, Tottori, 682-0193, Japan

T. Kunihiro1,

1Pheasant Memorial Laboratory, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University, Yamada 827, Misasa, Tottori, 682-0193, Japan

K. Kobayashi1,

1Pheasant Memorial Laboratory, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University, Yamada 827, Misasa, Tottori, 682-0193, Japan

E. Nakamura1

1Pheasant Memorial Laboratory, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University, Yamada 827, Misasa, Tottori, 682-0193, Japan

Affiliations  |  Corresponding Author  |  Cite as  |  Funding information

Potiszil, C., Tanaka, R., Ota, T., Kunihiro, T., Kobayashi, K., Nakamura, E. (2020) Concentration of meteoritic free organic matter by fluid transport and adsorption. Geochem. Persp. Let. 13, 30–35.

Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan

Geochemical Perspectives Letters v13  |  doi: 10.7185/geochemlet.2010
Received 26 June 2019  |  Accepted 13 February 2020  |  Published 17 March 2020
Copyright © The Authors

Published by the European Association of Geochemistry
under Creative Commons License CC BY-NC-ND 4.0




Figure 1 (a) An SEM image indicating the positions of chondrules (orange dashed lines) and matrix areas where EDX analyses were performed. (b) A topographic image of the sample surface obtained using a laser profiler. (c) An optical microscope image and topographic profile across the sample (red line).
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Figure 2 A compilation of DESI, Raman and correlation maps for selected alkylimidazole homologues. (a-c) DESI intensity maps for mass 139.12293, 181.16978 and 237.23225, respectively. Highest normalised intensity is 8.79 x 10-3, 1.22 x 10-2 and 3.84 x 10-3, respectively. (d) A schematic outlining the criteria for the generation of DESI vs. Raman correlation maps. (e-g) Correlation maps showing the similarity between a given DESI and high topography (HT) Raman map. (h) A Raman intensity map focused on high topography, for the interlayer/adsorbed water band (3000-3800 cm-1). (i-k) Correlation maps showing the similarity between a given DESI and low topography (LT) Raman map. (l) As for h except focused on low topography. Note that for the correlation maps a partially transparent white mask has been used to highlight the high topography (top 40 µm) or low topography (below top 40 µm).
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Figure 3 A compilation of DESI, Raman and correlation maps for selected alkylpyridine homologues. (a-c) DESI intensity maps for mass 136.11205, 178.15891 and 220.20580, respectively. Highest normalised intensity is 2.17 x 10-3, 5.44 x 10-2 and 2.58 x 10-3, respectively. (d) A schematic outlining the criteria for the generation of DESI vs. Raman correlation maps. (e-g) Correlation maps showing the similarity between a given DESI and high topography (HT) Raman map. (h) A Raman intensity map focused on high topography, for the interlayer/adsorbed water band (3000-3800 cm-1). (i-k) Correlation maps showing the similarity between a given DESI and low topography (LT) Raman map. (l) As for h except focused on low topography. Note that for the correlation maps a partially transparent white mask has been used to highlight the high topography (top 40 µm) or low topography (below top 40 µm).
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Figure 4 FOM distribution during aqueous alteration. (a) FOM and water ice are accreted by the parent body. (b) The ice melts and HMW FOM (red) adsorbs onto phases close to the site of accretion, but LMW and IMW FOM (light orange) are transported further into the matrix, generating a geochromatographic effect (red to light orange). (c) With the generation of phyllosilicates, adsorption of the remaining organic matter (LMW and IMW), as well as any previously adsorbed, occurs on these new charged mineral surfaces.
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